Providers are prime targets for cybercriminals. Are you ready?

The number of large-scale data breaches at American health care organization increased 65% from 2010 to 2016 (Source: OCR 2017). As a result, federal agencies are increasing their oversight and enforcement actions related to cybersecurity. And they are holding providers accountable.

This year John Riggi, AHA’s senior advisor for cybersecurity, former FBI cyber executive and a nationally recognized expert, launched AHA’s initial cybersecurity offerings to advise and assist our members.

Our goal is to help hospitals and health systems develop the defenses they need against this significant threat.

Advisory Services Overview

Learn more about the educational, assessment and consultative services available.

What’s Your Cyber Risk Profile?

12 considerations for CEOs who want to assess their risk readiness.

Advocacy Resources

Access AHA policy views and federal updates.

What's Ahead

How do hospital executives plan to deal with future threats?

High-Level Guide

Learn how cybersecurity impacts patient safety.

Intellectual Property Theft

Members-only white paper, outline growing concern about theft of U.S. medical research.

 
 
 

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Why & How to Incorporate Cyber Risk Management Into Enterprise Risk Management

Ransomware attacks on hospitals are not white collar crimes, they are threat-to-life crimes because they directly threaten a hospital’s ability to provide patient care, which puts patient safety at risk. That development was reinforced during the early days of the COVID-19 outbreak, when phishing emails and other cyber attacks on hospitals increased because cyber criminals treated the pandemic as an opportunity to exploit, victimize and profit.

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Ransomware Attacks on Hospitals Have Changed

Ransomware attacks on hospitals are not white collar crimes, they are threat-to-life crimes because they directly threaten a hospital’s ability to provide patient care, which puts patient safety at risk. That development was reinforced during the early days of the COVID-19 outbreak, when phishing emails and other cyber attacks on hospitals increased because cyber criminals treated the pandemic as an opportunity to exploit, victimize and profit.